Comments Roundup. A sad week for CRISPR crops in EU

CRISPR sad day

A shortlist of articles capturing ag scientists’ dismay at the recent EU verdict affecting the future of CRISPR crops:

Science Media Centre, Expert reaction to Court of Justice of the European Union ruling that GMO rules should cover plant genome editing techniques

Matt Ridley, EU’s anti-GMO crusade is unscientific and harmful

Mark Lynas, Scientific community defeated by green groups in European court ruling on gene edited crops

Carl Zimmer, What is a genetically modified crop? A European ruling sows confusion

The Observer view on Europe’s ban on gene-editing crops

Wired, European ruling could slow Africa’s push for CRISPR crops

 

 

 

How green is CRISPR future? The EU judgment is coming

sunflowers in Spain

Tomorrow, the European Court of Justice is set to pronounce a verdict on the legal status of organisms produced through mutagenesis. In January, the opinion of the Advocate General Michal Bobek was variously interpreted, but scientists are hopeful that the judgment of Case C 528/16 will help the European Commission to reasonably regulate new breeding technologies such as CRISPR. Continue reading

Another CRISPR havoc? That’s science, baby

keep-calm-and-sequence-dna

A paper published in Nature Biotechnology by Allan Bradley and colleagues from the Wellcome Sanger Institute in Hinxton, UK, shows that classical CRISPR editing can cause large rearrangements of DNA near the target site in actively dividing cells. We may think of it as the latest CRISPR alarm, but also as a demonstration of how biomedical research works. Firstly: no technology is perfect, but the best ones are perfectible. CRISPR belongs to this category because it is an extraordinarily versatile and fast-evolving biotech platform. When reading news like “CRISPR causes this or that problem,” the first question to ask is: which CRISPR variant are we talking about? Continue reading

Ground-cherries: will they be the next berry crop?

physalis

Physalis fruits look like golden marbles, larger than a blueberry, smaller than a grape. Carl Zimmer tried one, liked the rich pineapple-orange taste and wrote about their crispy future in his new book (“She Has Her Mother’s Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity”). Ground-cherries, as they are called, belong to the same family as tomatoes but are an impossible challenge for traditional breeding because they have four copies of each chromosome rather than two. Continue reading