Next-Gen CRISPR – pasting whole genes without cutting

PASTE is a three-part CRISPR tool invented at the MIT McGovern Institute for Brain Research. It’s composed of a modified CRISPR-Cas9 (it’s called nickase because it nicks a single DNA strand instead of cutting both) and two effectors: RT stands for reverse transcriptase (just like in prime editing) while LSR means large serine recombinase.

This brand-new molecular machine writes the genome in three steps. Step 1: the nickase finds the desired site. Step 2: the reverse transcriptase inserts a landing pad. Step 3: the recombinase lands there and delivers its large DNA cargo. The aim is to replace whole genes, when fixing mutations is not enough (one example is cystic fibrosis). Here are the links to learn more:

The PASTE paper by Jonathan Gootenberg and Omar Abudayyeh just published in Nature Biotechnology and the related News&Views.

The paper by David Liu, showing the way in Nature Biotechnology last December.

An article from the Boston Globe and a Twitter recap by Wei Zhao on who did what.

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